Gamecock Fanatics

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Hiking deaths...kind of a vent thread. :(

JimG

GCF Top Poster
Messages
3,321
Fanatics Cash
2,533
Points
350
Ok, so I live in the Phoenix area and do lots of hiking. The heat is a major issue once the weather gets hot.
In the winter, temps are not an issue unless you're hiking in higher elevations (possible cold).

Every year, people die hiking due to heat. The Grand Canyon as well. Just this week....36 yr old woman from Indiana.
Last summer, a local physician died on a trail hiking while it was above 100!

I just can't understand why people don't get this and continue to die for no reason. :oops:

 
Wow, good buy on Ritz crackers.



I think overheating is pretty tricky, because you're all right until you're not. I was just reading an article on sweating in Men's Health -- which I'm pretty sure qualifies me as a physician. It is so complicated -- no visible way to track core temperatures. Sweating complicates things by forcing changes on your blood chemistry, but even replacing fluids is complicated while under heat stress with electrolytes and sodium integral to that process.

Of course, there are also just stupid people (unprepared), but nature does have a way of weeding those out of the reproduction pool.
 
Don't want to sound heartless, but people live and die doing stupid things all the time. There's a constant supply of stupid/ignorant people in the world, regardless of other shortages.
 
I ride year round. People often ask me how in the world do I ride when the heat index is 100 or even higher? Easy I tell them, when you ride year round you get acclimated to the weather on both extremes. I've also ridden in 26 degree weather. It is what it is.

If you haven't done anything outside for months and you decide to go hiking or riding in hot weather you're just asking for trouble.
 
Ok, so I live in the Phoenix area and do lots of hiking. The heat is a major issue once the weather gets hot.
In the winter, temps are not an issue unless you're hiking in higher elevations (possible cold).

Every year, people die hiking due to heat. The Grand Canyon as well. Just this week....36 yr old woman from Indiana.
Last summer, a local physician died on a trail hiking while it was above 100!

I just can't understand why people don't get this and continue to die for no reason. :oops:

It's called pushing yourself for a reason, sometimes we push to hard, if you hike Murphy may have you on a trail thinking about this post one day. If you love hiking that is ok, if not quit hiking!
 
A friend took me up to the Snowbird ski resort in Salt Lake City some years ago in the early summer. The ski runs are popular with mountain bikers in the summertime. We took the tram up to the top of a mountain and you could hear the runoff from the melting snow for miles around. It was fantastic.

I remember one of the park workers saying it was pretty common for people to hike down into the surrounding valleys with just a bottle of water and get into trouble.

I am fair-skinned with freckles and made a dedicated effort to exercise either in the morning or late afternoon after I had some skin cancer places removed about 20 years ago. No problems since. I usually wear a nice straw hat if I have to work in the yard in the middle of the day.

I used to run 5 miles every other day up until a few years ago, so with me it's more about the sun than the heat. Eating clean also helps along with proper hydration if you're exercising in the extreme heat, too. I also remember a thread on CT some years ago about how doing squats on a regular basis was great for explosive running. That seem to help with hiking uphill in extreme to me as well. JMO
 
Boils down to people being unprepared. Same things happens with cool weather, when people go out without any gear, and end up with hypothermia.
 
Boils down to people being unprepared. Same things happens with cool weather, when people go out without any gear, and end up with hypothermia.
There is no wind in many canyon valleys as well. Also the evening shade comes out sooner in the valleys late in the day depending on the position of the sun overhead. It's definitely something to consider in the fall and winter months.
 
Top